IRS Whistleblower Program – Deadlines Drives Success

IRS Whistleblower Program – Deadlines Drives Success

The revised IRS whistleblower program is on its 13th year.  The good news is that last year the IRS disclosed it collected $1.5 billion as a result of whistleblowers.  However, the bad news was that it took an average of 9.32 years for the IRS to pay an award to the whistleblower.  In order for the IRS to increase the success rate of the whistleblower program, there needs to be deadlines; for example, the IRS’ April 15th return filing deadline is probably one of the most recognized deadlines.

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So You Want to Be an IRS Tax Whistleblower?

So You Want to Be an IRS Tax Whistleblower?

To be a successful IRS Tax Whistleblower, an individual needs to have “specific and credible” information that leads the IRS to the detection and collection of the underpayment of a tax.  Simply “believing” or “thinking” that there has been an underpayment of tax is not enough; a tax whistleblower must have actionable information and supporting documentation verifying the information. 

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IRS Updates Form 211

From IRS.gov

Form 211 Application for Award for Original Information. Among many changes, some of the highlights of the updated form are shared below:

  • Rearranged the information requested into appropriate sections
  • Section headers clearly identifying and separating the information were added
  • The instructions were updated for clarity

The Whistleblower Office will continue to accept the previous version of the form for a limited time. Please begin using the new Form 211 (Rev. 07-2018) for new submissions.